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The New York Times The New York Times Arts June 1, 2002  

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Creative Cities and Their New Elite

By EMILY EAKIN

Should Pittsburgh recruit gay people to jump-start its economy? Should Buffalo another fiscally flat-lining city give tax breaks to bohemians? As policy prescriptions go, these sound absurd. But according to a new theory devised by Richard Florida, a professor of regional economic development at Carnegie Mellon University, towns that have lots of gays and bohemians (by which he means authors, painters, musicians and other "artistically creative people") are likely to thrive.

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